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Posts Tagged ‘Tools’

Hunting down learning tools

May 28, 2010 1 comment

Most of us use software tools like Microsoft Word and PowerPoint to develop teaching and learning resources, but what if you want to do something a bit more creative or innovative, what other tools are available?  A good place to find out is Jane Hart’s website, Centre for Learning & Perfomance Technologies (C4LPT). Jane used to work in Higher Education and is now a Learning Consultant and regular speaker at learning events and through her website she shares free resources about learning trends, technologies and tools.

One of the popular features of Jane’s website is the Directory of Learning Tools, which details hundreds of both commercial, free and open source tools.  You can browse for tools under different categories such as instructional tools for creating online content, image, audio and video tools, blogging and wiki tools and also collaboration tools.  Each category has tools organised in A-Z lists so if you’re looking for something specific it’s easy to find.

Another feature of the C4LPT is the ‘top tools’ feature.  Jane invites teachers to submit their top 10 teaching and top 10 learning tools each year and then compiles an annual top 100. You can see which tools made the top 100 for 2009, based on contributions from 278 learning professionals worldwide, in the presentation below and read more about  the individual contributions to the list here.

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Categories: General, Tools Tags: , ,

Evernote: a tool for your PLE

February 9, 2010 1 comment

I’m kicking off my series of blog posts focusing on tools you might want to consider having in your PLE with a look at Evernote. If you follow educationalists and teachers on Twitter one of the tools you’ll often see them tweeting about is Evernote and you’ll notice they are giving it a positive press.  Evernote is a free app (though there is also a paid version available), which works a bit like Microsoft’s One Note. It allows you to take clippings of websites, files, images, photographs, videos and audio recordings and tag them for easy retrieval and organise them into notebooks.  Also everything you clip and store is easily searchable, including handwritten notes and text in images. You can also share your clippings so if you’re working on a group project it’s easy to share the resources that you find.

The real beauty of Evernote is that you can use it as a web service on any web browser, but you can also install the application on your own personal Windows or Mac desktop, your iPod Touch/iPhone.  It also works on Android phones, the Blackberry,  Palm Pre and Windows mobile. You can synchronise your Evernote account with your desktop or mobile device and access your notes offline. This ability to access your notes without an internet connection is what I really find helpful, particularly on a hand held device like the iPod Touch, I have all my notes and helpful resources at my fingertips even when I can’t get a wireless connection.

There’s a helpful overview of how you can use Evernote as a tool in your personal learning environment that’s been put together by a US medical student Ryan McDonald.  Ryan calls Evernote his ‘medical peripheral brain’, unfortunately I can’t embed his video here but you take a look at it on his screencast page and see how he uses it to support his medical studies.

The Evernote website has a series of videos which give an overview of its features and how people are using it.  There are several videos which include students talking about why they use Evernote.  You can use Evernote for all sorts of things, I use it to support my ongoing life long learning but the more I use it the more uses I find for it.

If you want to find out more about how people are using Evernote here are some additional links you might want to take a look at.

Evernote: Redefining my organisational thinking – Academic Life in Emergency Medicine Blog

14 Practical Ways to Use Evernote – Guy Kawasaki

Ron’s Evernote Tips